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predict

Predict response at time steps in observed test data

Since R2023b

    Description

    example

    predictedY = predict(Mdl,TestTbl) predicts the response at each horizon step in Mdl.Horizon for the observations in the time span covered by TestTbl. Before predicting, the function uses the test data TestTbl to prepare lagged and leading predictors. Then, for each horizon step in the direct forecasting model Mdl, the function uses the corresponding model in Mdl.Learners to predict the response.

    predictedY = predict(Mdl,TestX,TestY) returns predictions for the test set exogenous predictor data TestX and the test set response data TestY. This syntax assumes that Mdl uses exogenous predictors and lagged response variables as predictors. That is, Mdl.PredictorNames and Mdl.ResponseLags are nonempty.

    predictedY = predict(Mdl,TestX) returns test set predictions when the model Mdl does not use lagged response variables as predictors. That is, Mdl.ResponseLags must be empty.

    predictedY = predict(Mdl,TestY) returns test set predictions when the model Mdl does not use exogenous predictors. That is, Mdl.PredictorNames must be empty.

    Examples

    collapse all

    After creating a DirectForecaster object, see how the model performs on observed test data by using the predict object function. Then use the model to forecast at time steps beyond the available data by using the forecast object function.

    Load the sample file TemperatureData.csv, which contains average daily temperatures from January 2015 through July 2016. Read the file into a table. Observe the first eight observations in the table.

    temperatures = readtable("TemperatureData.csv");
    head(temperatures)
        Year       Month       Day    TemperatureF
        ____    ___________    ___    ____________
    
        2015    {'January'}     1          23     
        2015    {'January'}     2          31     
        2015    {'January'}     3          25     
        2015    {'January'}     4          39     
        2015    {'January'}     5          29     
        2015    {'January'}     6          12     
        2015    {'January'}     7          10     
        2015    {'January'}     8           4     
    

    For this example, use a subset of the temperature data that omits the first 100 observations.

    Tbl = temperatures(101:end,:);

    Create a datetime variable t that contains the year, month, and day information for each observation in Tbl. Then, use t to convert Tbl into a timetable.

    numericMonth = month(datetime(Tbl.Month, ...
        InputFormat="MMMM"));
    t = datetime(Tbl.Year,numericMonth,Tbl.Day);
    Tbl.Time = t;
    Tbl = table2timetable(Tbl);

    Plot the temperature values in Tbl over time.

    plot(Tbl.Time,Tbl.TemperatureF)
    xlabel("Date")
    ylabel("Temperature in Fahrenheit")

    Figure contains an axes object. The axes object with xlabel Date, ylabel Temperature in Fahrenheit contains an object of type line.

    Partition the temperature data into training and test sets by using tspartition. Reserve 20% of the observations for testing.

    partition = tspartition(size(Tbl,1),"Holdout",0.20);
    trainingTbl = Tbl(training(partition),:);
    testTbl = Tbl(test(partition),:);

    Create a full direct forecasting model by using the data in trainingTbl. Train the model using a decision tree learner. All three of the predictors (Year, Month, and Day) are leading predictors because their future values are known. To create new predictors by shifting the leading predictor and response variables backward in time, specify the leading predictor lags and the response variable lags.

    Mdl = directforecaster(trainingTbl,"TemperatureF", ...
        Learner="tree", ...
        LeadingPredictors="all",LeadingPredictorLags={0:1,0:1,0:7}, ...
        ResponseLags=1:7)
    Mdl = 
      DirectForecaster
    
                      Horizon: 1
                 ResponseLags: [1 2 3 4 5 6 7]
            LeadingPredictors: [1 2 3]
         LeadingPredictorLags: {[0 1]  [0 1]  [0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7]}
                 ResponseName: 'TemperatureF'
               PredictorNames: {'Year'  'Month'  'Day'}
        CategoricalPredictors: 2
                     Learners: {[1x1 classreg.learning.regr.CompactRegressionTree]}
                       MaxLag: 7
              NumObservations: 372
    
    
    

    Mdl is a DirectForecaster model object. By default, the horizon is one step ahead. That is, Mdl predicts a value that is one step into the future.

    For each test set observation, predict the temperature value using Mdl.

    predictedY = predict(Mdl,testTbl)
    predictedY=93×1 timetable
           Time        TemperatureF_Step1
        ___________    __________________
    
        16-Apr-2016          49.398      
        17-Apr-2016          39.419      
        18-Apr-2016          39.419      
        19-Apr-2016          45.333      
        20-Apr-2016          35.867      
        21-Apr-2016          34.222      
        22-Apr-2016          45.333      
        23-Apr-2016          66.392      
        24-Apr-2016          44.111      
        25-Apr-2016              49      
        26-Apr-2016              49      
        27-Apr-2016          34.222      
        28-Apr-2016          43.333      
        29-Apr-2016          34.222      
        30-Apr-2016          34.222      
        01-May-2016          34.222      
          ⋮
    
    

    Plot the true response values and the predicted response values for the test set observations.

    plot(testTbl.Time,testTbl.TemperatureF)
    hold on
    plot(predictedY.Time,predictedY.TemperatureF_Step1,"--")
    hold off
    legend("True","Predicted",Location="southeast")
    xlabel("Date")
    ylabel("Temperature in Fahrenheit")

    Figure contains an axes object. The axes object with xlabel Date, ylabel Temperature in Fahrenheit contains 2 objects of type line. These objects represent True, Predicted.

    Overall, the direct forecasting model is able to predict the trend in temperatures.

    Retrain the direct forecasting model using the training and test data. To forecast temperatures one week beyond the available data, specify the horizon steps as one to seven steps ahead.

    finalMdl = directforecaster(Tbl,"TemperatureF", ...
        Learner="tree", ...
        LeadingPredictors="all",LeadingPredictorLags={0:1,0:1,0:7}, ...
        ResponseLags=1:7,Horizon=1:7)
    finalMdl = 
      DirectForecaster
    
                      Horizon: [1 2 3 4 5 6 7]
                 ResponseLags: [1 2 3 4 5 6 7]
            LeadingPredictors: [1 2 3]
         LeadingPredictorLags: {[0 1]  [0 1]  [0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7]}
                 ResponseName: 'TemperatureF'
               PredictorNames: {'Year'  'Month'  'Day'}
        CategoricalPredictors: 2
                     Learners: {7x1 cell}
                       MaxLag: 7
              NumObservations: 465
    
    
    

    finalMdl is a DirectForecaster model object that consists of seven regression models: finalMdl.Learners{1}, which predicts one step into the future; finalMdl.Learners{2}, which predicts two steps into the future; and so on.

    Because finalMdl uses the unshifted values of the leading predictors Year, Month, and Day as predictor values, you must specify these values for the specified horizon steps in the call to forecast. For the week after the last available observation in Tbl, create a timetable forecastData with the year, month, and day values.

    forecastTime = Tbl.Time(end,:)+1:Tbl.Time(end,:)+7;
    forecastYear = year(forecastTime);
    forecastMonth = month(forecastTime,"name");
    forecastDay = day(forecastTime);
    forecastData = timetable(forecastTime',forecastYear', ...
        forecastMonth',forecastDay',VariableNames=["Year","Month","Day"])
    forecastData=7×3 timetable
           Time        Year     Month      Day
        ___________    ____    ________    ___
    
        18-Jul-2016    2016    {'July'}    18 
        19-Jul-2016    2016    {'July'}    19 
        20-Jul-2016    2016    {'July'}    20 
        21-Jul-2016    2016    {'July'}    21 
        22-Jul-2016    2016    {'July'}    22 
        23-Jul-2016    2016    {'July'}    23 
        24-Jul-2016    2016    {'July'}    24 
    
    

    Forecast the temperature at each horizon step using finalMdl.

    forecastY = forecast(finalMdl,Tbl,LeadingData=forecastData)
    forecastY=7×1 timetable
           Time        TemperatureF
        ___________    ____________
    
        18-Jul-2016       62.375   
        19-Jul-2016         64.5   
        20-Jul-2016       66.889   
        21-Jul-2016       66.889   
        22-Jul-2016         70.5   
        23-Jul-2016        74.25   
        24-Jul-2016        74.25   
    
    

    Plot the observed temperatures for the test set data and the forecast temperatures.

    plot(testTbl.Time,testTbl.TemperatureF)
    hold on
    plot([testTbl.Time(end);forecastY.Time], ...
        [testTbl.TemperatureF(end);forecastY.TemperatureF],"--")
    hold off
    legend("Observed Data","Forecast Data", ...
        Location="southeast")
    xlabel("Date")
    ylabel("Temperature in Farenheit")

    Figure contains an axes object. The axes object with xlabel Date, ylabel Temperature in Farenheit contains 2 objects of type line. These objects represent Observed Data, Forecast Data.

    Input Arguments

    collapse all

    Direct forecasting model, specified as a DirectForecaster or CompactDirectForecaster model object.

    Test set data, specified as a table or timetable. Each row of TestTbl corresponds to one observation, and each column corresponds to one variable. TestTbl must have the same data type as the predictor data argument used to train Mdl, and must include all exogenous predictors and the response variable.

    Test set exogenous predictor data, specified as a numeric matrix, table, or timetable. Each row of TestX corresponds to one observation, and each column corresponds to one predictor. TestX must have the same data type as the predictor data argument used to train Mdl, and must consist of the same exogenous predictors.

    Test set response data, specified as a numeric vector, one-column table, or one-column timetable. Each row of TestY corresponds to one observation.

    • If TestX is a numeric matrix, then TestY must be a numeric vector.

    • If TestX is a table, then TestY must be a numeric vector or one-column table.

    • If TestX is a timetable or it is not specified, then TestY must be a numeric vector, one-column table, or one-column timetable.

    If you specify both TestX and TestY, then they must have the same number of observations.

    Output Arguments

    collapse all

    Predicted test set responses, returned as a numeric matrix, table, or timetable.

    • predictedY has the same data type as the test set predictor data TestTbl or TestX when the predictor data is specified. Otherwise, predictedY has the same data type as TestY.

    • predictedY is of size n-by-h, where n is the number of test observations and h is the number of horizon steps (that is, the number of elements in Mdl.Horizon).

    Limitations

    • When you use the predict object function, the test set data must contain at least Mdl.MaxLag + max(Mdl.Horizon) observations. The software requires these observations for creating lagged and leading predictors.

    Version History

    Introduced in R2023b